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10 Poverty Myths, Busted | Mother Jones

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

http://coldhearted-icequeen.tumblr.com/post/83500175232/spotthebunneh-coldhearted-icequeen-i-cant

spotthebunneh:

coldhearted-icequeen:

I can’t find that one post but

yeah make up and heels don’t smash the patriarchy

conforming to patriarchal sex-based norms isn’t radical

doing what the patriarchy expects and wants you to do isn’t furthering feminism

wear make up, wear heels,…

Haha I guess I was expecting an actual response or rebuttal, not expecting to be brushed off. I had to look up third wave feminism, I haven’t really thought about giving myself a label but I guess that’ll do.
Honestly though I feel like you’re saying if you conform to gender norms then you deserve to be treated poorly by men. Like if you wear dresses and heels and jewelry and “feminine” things that gives men the right to think of you as just another dumb girl.
You can’t blame women for what men do.
I don’t think not wearing heels and makeup is going to change anything.
I think its wrong to tell women their feminism is wrong if they take pride in how they appear. Besides, haven’t you read all those “things guys hate ” lists? Apparently they hate lipstick! I say wear what makes you comfortable and if it makes a man uncomfortable, it’s just a bonus.

Relaxing with a blueberry mango smoothie and skyrim

Relaxing with a blueberry mango smoothie and skyrim

Daniel Franzese, Damian of Mean Girls, comes out -- and don't you dare say he's too gay to function

gaywrites:

Ten years after the debut of the life-altering movie that is Mean Girls, actor Daniel Franzese, who played openly gay high schooler Damian, has come out as gay.

Franzese, now 36, wrote a letter to his character that was published in IndieWire. He asks himself why it had taken him so long to come out as gay, saying that his portrayal of Damian actually set him back in Hollywood and in his own personal coming to terms with himself.

The whole thing is damn insightful and meaningful, but here’s a particularly telling excerpt about how Daniel’s career took an unexpected turn after he played Damian:

One time I wanted to audition for a supporting character in a low-budget indie movie described as a “doughy, blue-collar lug of a guy.”  The role was to play the husband of an actress friend of mine who I had been in two movies and an Off-Broadway play with.  She and I had even moved to L.A. together. I figured I was perfect for it.

They said they were looking for a real “man’s man.”  The casting director wouldn’t even let me audition. This wasn’t the last time this happened. There were industry people who had seen me play you in Mean Girls but never seen me read in an audition but still denied me to be seen for “masculine” roles.

However, I did turn down many offers to play flamboyant, feather-boa-slinging stereotypes that always seemed to be laughed at BECAUSE they were gay. How could I go from playing an inspirational, progressive gay youth to the embarrassing, cliched butt-of-a-joke? 

So, there it was. Damian, you had ruined my life and I was really pissed at you. I became celibate for a year and a half. I didn’t go to any gay bars, have any flings and I lied to anyone who asked if I was gay. I even brought a girl to the ‘Mean Girls’ premiere and kissed her on the red carpet, making her my unwitting beard.  

Why come out now, then? 

It wasn’t until years later that grown men started to coming up to me on the street - some of them in tears - and thanking me for being a role model to them. Telling me I gave them comfort not only being young and gay but also being a big dude. It was then that I realized how much of an impact YOU had made on them.  

Before you make the “too gay to function” joke, which I totally did before I finished reading the article, listen to what he has to say about it:

I hate it when people say I’m ‘too gay to function.’ I know you do, too. Those people are part of the problem. They should refrain from using that phrase. It really is only OK when Janis says it.

It takes some serious guts to be this open about the intermingling of your career and your personal life, especially when admitting that playing a beloved character in a classic movie has impacted you in a negative way. I have loads of respect for this man. Congrats, Daniel. 

thefrogman:

[video]

thefrogman:

[video]

crayonguy:

Bunny master post

septagonstudios:

Samantha Mash ON TUMBLR

septagonstudios:

Samantha Mash ON TUMBLR

(Source: julessonoferis)

coldhearted-icequeen:

I can’t find that one post but

yeah make up and heels don’t smash the patriarchy

conforming to patriarchal sex-based norms isn’t radical

doing what the patriarchy expects and wants you to do isn’t furthering feminism

wear make up, wear heels, do whatever, but critically analyze why and realize that it’s not a feminist act and never has or will be.

Pretty sure feminism is about the right to choose how to live your life without being judged. This sounds kind of like internal misogyny, “don’t be like other girls, they’re shallow and vain because they wear makeup “
Wearing heels doesn’t make you less of a feminist, your actions or lack thereof determines that.
Standing up for people, calling out micro-aggressions, signing petitions, listening to less privileged peoples stories! These are the things we should be talking about, not people’s aesthetic choices.

When you grow up as a girl, the world tells you the things that you are supposed to be: emotional, loving, beautiful, wanted. And then when you are those things, the world tells you they are inferior: illogical, weak, vain, empty.

- Stevie Nicks (via dare-you-to-love-me)

(Source: bmurguia)